Tag Archives: Seder

A Matzah Mosaic Decorating Party!

The whole idea behind the Passover holiday is to get the kids involved. What better way than to have a matzah decorating party? Every year my kids enjoy decorating sheets of matzah that we give to our guests as gifts to take home with them after the Seder meal. Just melt chocolate and paint it on using pastry brushes, then stick on your favorite candies, sprinkles, or chopped up nuts and dried fruit. It’s fun for adults as well! Make sure that the chocolate has dried completely before placing into Ziploc baggies and storing in the freezer until ready to eat. You need only defrost about 20 minutes before.

MatzahDecorating_2MatzahDecorating_1MatzahDecorating_3MatzahDecorating_5MatzahDecorating_4

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Grandma Fritzie’s Syrian Passover Soup

Soup_KibbehHamdah872dpi

Today’s post by the Jewish Food Society shows my family recipe for Kibbeh Hamdah, a Syrian soup made with lamb meatballs, dried mint, and lots of lemon. If you like tart flavors, this is the dish for you. Enjoy!

 

Moroccan Date-Raisin Haroset “Truffles”

Charoset_Moroccan_TruffleBalls_10_blog

 

Moroccan Style Haroset
(Cinnamon Dusted Date-Raisin “Truffles” with Walnuts, Rolled in Cinnamon)
Yield: Serves 12 / Makes approximately 3 cups or 4 dozen 1-inch balls

A recipe from my cookbook Too Good To Passover: Sephardic & Judeo-Arabic Menus and Memories from Africa, Asia and Europe, Section 1: Africa, Chapter 5.

This Moroccan haroset is shaped into a small ball, then rolled in ground cinnamon to resemble an elegant truffle. For the most impressive way to serve visually, stack balls on top of one another into a pyramid shape on an elegant platter alongside any other more classic haroset spread in a bowl. When it comes time to eat, guests may help themselves to a single truffle and eat it straight, or pressed down between two small pieces of matzah as a sandwich.

For Haroset:
1 cup walnuts

½ cup slivered almonds
12 large Medjool dates or 20 regular-size dates, pitted and cut into large pieces
½ cup golden raisins
½ cup dark raisins
3 to 4 tablespoons sweet Passover wine, such as Manischewitz

For Serving:
1 box of matzah/matzo squares or mini matzah crackers

Cinnamon (for rolling and dusting the outside)

DIRECTIONS:
1. Place the walnuts and almonds in the food processor and pulse until coarsely ground, but not into a meal-like consistency (about 30 seconds).

2. Add the dates and raisins and combine in the food processor for about 30 seconds.

3. Add the wine and pulse until the mixture becomes a soft paste.

4. Taking one level tablespoon (or mini melon ball scoop) at a time, roll the thick paste into 1-inch balls* (if the paste is sticking too much to your hands, try dipping your hands in cold water and then rolling them).

5. When all of the balls have been rolled, pour a couple of tablespoons of ground
cinnamon onto a small plate and gently roll each ball in the cinnamon to lightly coat the outside. (You can also dust your hands with cinnamon and then roll each ball again
between your palms to lightly coat, whichever way is easier.)

6. Serve haroset balls at room temperature stacked in a small decorative bowl or on a small platter alongside tea matzahs. Store balls in a tightly covered plastic container between layers of parchment or wax paper in the refrigerator for up to three days, or the freezer for up to one month.

*Note: If you wish to serve the mixture in the more common way of a paste in a bowl, then add a little more wine or warm water to make a bit smoother and softer for spreading.

The Seder gift that is (really) “Too Good To Passover!”

Now that Purim is over, the countdown for Passover has begun! If you are hosting a Seder or invited to one as a guest, don’t forget to make Too Good To Passover a part of your holiday.

Please spread the word to your friends, colleagues, and family.
(And thank you for leaving a book review! 🙂 )

CLICK HERE TO ORDER in the U.S.A.

For those of you outside of the U.S. you can order my book and have it shipped directly from the local Amazon in the following countries:

CANADA
FRANCE
SPAIN
ITALY
GERMANY
U.K. & IRELAND
NETHERLANDS

Thank you,

JenniferAbadi_small

Jennifer

About Too Good To Passover
Too Good To Passover is the first Passover cookbook specializing in traditional Sephardic, Judeo-Arabic, and Central Asian recipes and customs (covering both pre- and post-Passover rituals) appealing to Sephardic, Mizrahic, and Ashkenazic individuals who are interested in incorporating something traditional yet new into their Seders.

A compilation of more than 200 Passover recipes from 23 Jewish communities, this cookbook-memoir provides an anthropological as well as historical context to the ways in which the Jewish communities of North Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean, and Middle East observe and enjoy this beloved ancient festival.

In addition to full Seder menus, Passover-week recipes, and at least one “break-fast” dish, each chapter opens up with the reflections of a few individuals from that region or territory. Readers can learn about the person’s memories of Passover as well as the varying customs regarding pre-Passover rituals, including cleaning the home of all hametz or “leavening,” Seder customs (such as reenacting the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt), or post-Passover celebrations, such as the Moroccan Mimouneh for marking the end of the week-long “bread fast.” These customs provide a more complete sense of the cultural variations of the holiday.

Too Good To Passover is a versatile and inspiring reference cookbook, appealing to those who may want to do a different “theme” each Passover year, with possibly a Turkish Seder one year, or Moroccan one the next.

See inside my book! Sample Spreads:

TooGoodToPassover_InteriorSpread_Iraq_1

TooGoodToPassover_InteriorSpread_Iraq_2TooGoodToPassover_InteriorSpread_Iraq_3TooGoodToPassover_JAbadi_KINDLE_cover_AFRICA_blog_outlined

The following 3 e-booklets are
also available on Amazon
:
E-BOOKLET 1: Seder Menus and Memories from AFRICA
(Pages 1-223/Chapters 1-6:
Algeria, Egypt, Ethiopia, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia)

E-BOOKLET 2: Seder Menus and Memories from ASIA
(Pages 225-473/Chapters 7-13:
Afghanistan & Bukharia, India, Iran, Iraq, Syria & Lebanon, Turkey, Yemen)

E-BOOKLET 3: Seder Menus and Memories from EUROPE
(Pages 475-665/Chapters 14-18:
Bulgaria & Moldova, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal & Gibraltar)

Jennifer_WritingRecipe_3BW

About Jennifer Abadi
Jennifer Abadi lives in New York City and is a researcher, developer, and preserver of Sephardic and Judeo-Arabic recipes and food customs. A culinary expert in the Jewish communities of the Middle East, Mediterranean, Central Asia, and North Africa, Jennifer teaches cooking at the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE) and at the Jewish Community Center Manhattan (JCC). She also offers private lessons and works for a variety of clients in the New York City area as a personal chef. In addition, Jennifer provides Jewish food and culture tours on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Her first cookbook-memoir, A Fistful of Lentils: Syrian-Jewish Recipes From Grandma Fritzie’s Kitchen is a collection of recipe and stores from her family. Too Good To Passover is her second cookbook.

“Too Good To Passover” Book-Signings and Talks

“Too Good To Passover” Cookbook
Talk, Signing and Haroset Tasting

WHEN:
Sunday, March 4
11:15 am-1 pm

WHERE:
Glen Rock Jewish Center
682 Harristown Road
Glen Rock, NJ

EVENT: 
$5 entrance fee for non-Sisterhood Members;
Food donations for the local shelter welcome.

Signed copies of my new cookbook
“Too Good To Passover:
Seder Menus & Memories from
Africa, Asia, and Europe”
will be on sale following the talk
(cash preferred;  payment by check
or Chase QuickPay also accepted)

The following 3 tastes will be served:
(KOSHER: Parve)

Moroccan Haroset
(Cinnamon Dusted Date-Raisin “Truffles”
with Walnuts, Rolled in Cinnamon

Syrian Haroset
(Apricot Spread with Pistachios,
and Orange Blossom Water)

Portuguese Haroset
(Raisin and Banana Spread with Pistachios,
Ginger, Allspice, and Sangria)

RSVP:
sisterhood@grjc.org

 

“Too Good To Passover” Cookbook
Talk & Signing

WHEN:
Sunday, March 11
2—4 pm

WHERE:
Kehila Kedosha Janina
280 Broome Street

EVENT: 
Entrance FREE!
Signed copies of my new cookbook
“Too Good To Passover:
Seder Menus & Memories from
Africa, Asia, and Europe”
will be on sale following the talk
(cash preferred; check and PayPal
also accepted)

Kosher refreshments will be served.

RSVP:
museum@kkjsm.org
516-456-9336

 

“Too Good To Passover” Sephardic Seder
Cooking Class
(Meat/NOT KOSHER)

Each student will receive a signed copy
of my new cookbook:
“Too Good To Passover:
Seder Menus & Memories
from Africa, Asia, and Europe!”

WHEN:
Monday, March 12
10 am-2:30 pm

WHERE:
ICE (the Institute of Culinary Education)
225 Liberty Street

MENU:
Syrian Haroset with Dried Apricots, Pistachios,
and Orange Blossom Water

Moroccan Haroset “Truffles” with Dates,
Raisins, and Walnuts

Iranian Chicken Soup with
Chickpea Dumplings

Moroccan Potato Pie
Stuffed with Spiced Beef

Algerian Fish Dumplings
with Tomatoes & Fresh Coriander

Moroccan Stewed Prunes with Onions,
Cinnamon, and Roasted Almonds

Persian Pistachio Cake
wtih Cardamom Syrup

Italian Macaroons with
Almonds and Pignoli Nuts

TO REGISTER:
recreational.ice.edu
800.522.4610

 

“Too Good To Passover” Cookbook
Talk, Signing and Haroset Tasting

WHEN:
Sunday, March 18
4—5:30 pm

WHERE:
SAJ (The Society for the Advancement of Judaism)
15 West 86th Street
(Between Central Park West & Columbus Avenues)

EVENT:
Entrance FREE!
(Donations welcome to support learning at
SAJ’s Makom and Pela family education programs.)
Signed copies of my new cookbook
“Too Good To Passover:
Seder Menus & Memories from
Africa, Asia, and Europe”
will be on sale following the talk
(cash preferred;  payment by check
or Chase QuickPay also accepted)

MENU: The following 3 tastes will be served:
(KOSHER STYLE: Parve/Non-dairy)

Moroccan Haroset
(Cinnamon Dusted Date-Raisin “Truffles”
with Walnuts, Rolled in Cinnamon

Syrian Haroset
(Apricot Spread with Pistachios,
and Orange Blossom Water)

Portuguese Haroset
(Raisin and Banana Spread with Pistachios,
Ginger, Allspice, and Sangria)

QUESTIONS:
thesaj.org

REGISTER:
SAJ Registration Page

 

Sephardic Vegetarian Seder
Cooking Class

(Kosher: Dairy/Vegetarian)

Signed copies of my new cookbook
“Too Good To Passover:
Seder Menus & Memories from
Africa, Asia, and Europe”
will be on sale following the talk
(cash preferred;  payment by check
or Chase QuickPay also accepted)

WHEN:
Monday, March 19th
7-9:30 pm

WHERE:
JCC Manhattan
(Jewish Community Center)
334 Amsterdam Ave @76th Street

MENU:
Greek Haroset with Black Raisins, Oranges,
Walnuts, and Apple Cider Vinegar

Turkish Matzah Spread with Feta Cheese,
Paprika, Garlic, and Mint

Italian Matzah “Lasagna” with Crushed Tomatoes,
Basil, and Pot Cheese

Sephardic Carrot Salad with Cumin,
Raisins and Saffron

Egyptian Macaroons with
Toasted Walnuts, Pecans, and Dates

TO REGISTER:
jccmanhattan.org
646. 505.5713

 

Egyptian Passover Tasting & Demo Fundraiser
for the JDC (Jewish Joint Distribution Committee)


EVENT:
Suggested donation: $180/person
(fully tax deductible!)
—Your donation for this event will secure
your registration, while allowing the JDC to provide
lifesaving support and food for one of the poorest
Jews in the world for 8 months!

A signed copy of my new cookbook
“Too Good To Passover:
Seder Menus & Memories from
Africa, Asia, and Europe”
is included with your donation/registration!

WHEN:
Monday, March 26th
6-7:30 pm

WHERE:
450 West 17th Street
Social Room on 14th Floor

MENU: The following tastes will be
served 
(KOSHER: Dairy/Vegetarian):

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE DEMONSTRATED
AND SERVED:
Beignets de Fromage:
Matzah-Cheese Fritters with Honey & Silan

THE FOLLOWING TASTES WILL BE SERVED:
Moroccan Haroset Date-Raisin “Truffles” Rolled in Cinnamon
Syrian Apricot Haroset with Pistachios and Orange Blossom Water
Italian Date-Banana Haroset with Oranges, Cinnamon and Cloves

TO REGISTER:
Donate.JDC.org

TO REGISTER:
Please contact Tarang Jagota
tarang.jagota@jdc.org

“Too Good To Passover” Cookbook Now Available!

Dear Friends,

Happy new year!

After 9 years of doing research, conducting interviews, and developing recipes, I am happy to announce that my new cookbook: Too Good To Passover: Sephardic & Judeo-Arabic Seder Menus and Memories from Africa, Asia and Europe is finally available!

I appreciate your support by following my blog these last few years.
Please help me to make this cookbook a success by ordering a copy on Amazon,
and spreading the word to your friends, colleagues, and family.
The more books I sell, the better ranking it will have!

CLICK HERE TO ORDER!

For those of you outside of the U.S. you can order my book and have it shipped directly from the local Amazon in the following countries:

CANADA
FRANCE
SPAIN
ITALY
GERMANY
U.K. & IRELAND
NETHERLANDS

I am now scheduling talks and book-signing events for the winter and early spring leading up to Passover. If any of you know any journalists I could send a review copy to, or have connections with any radio shows or TV networks for me to discuss my book, please let me know.

Thank you,

JenniferAbadi_small

Jennifer

About Too Good To Passover
Too Good To Passover is the first Passover cookbook specializing in traditional Sephardic, Judeo-Arabic, and Central Asian recipes and customs (covering both pre- and post-Passover rituals) appealing to Sephardic, Mizrahic, and Ashkenazic individuals who are interested in incorporating something traditional yet new into their Seders.

A compilation of more than 200 Passover recipes from 23 Jewish communities, this cookbook-memoir provides an anthropological as well as historical context to the ways in which the Jewish communities of North Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean, and Middle East observe and enjoy this beloved ancient festival.

In addition to full Seder menus, Passover-week recipes, and at least one “break-fast” dish, each chapter opens up with the reflections of a few individuals from that region or territory. Readers can learn about the person’s memories of Passover as well as the varying customs regarding pre-Passover rituals, including cleaning the home of all hametz or “leavening,” Seder customs (such as reenacting the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt), or post-Passover celebrations, such as the Moroccan Mimouneh for marking the end of the week-long “bread fast.” These customs provide a more complete sense of the cultural variations of the holiday.

Too Good To Passover is a versatile and inspiring reference cookbook, appealing to those who may want to do a different “theme” each Passover year, with possibly a Turkish Seder one year, or Moroccan one the next.

See inside my book! Sample Spreads:

TooGoodToPassover_InteriorSpread_Iraq_1

TooGoodToPassover_InteriorSpread_Iraq_2TooGoodToPassover_InteriorSpread_Iraq_3TooGoodToPassover_JAbadi_KINDLE_cover_AFRICA_blog_outlined

The following 3 e-booklets are
also available on Amazon
:

E-BOOKLET 1: Seder Menus and Memories from AFRICA
(Pages 1-223/Chapters 1-6:
Algeria, Egypt, Ethiopia, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia)

E-BOOKLET 2: Seder Menus and Memories from ASIA
(Pages 225-473/Chapters 7-13:
Afghanistan & Bukharia, India, Iran, Iraq, Syria & Lebanon, Turkey, Yemen)

E-BOOKLET 3: Seder Menus and Memories from EUROPE
(Pages 475-665/Chapters 14-18:
Bulgaria & Moldova, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal & Gibraltar)

Jennifer_WritingRecipe_3BW

About Jennifer Abadi
Jennifer Abadi lives in New York City and is a researcher, developer, and preserver of Sephardic and Judeo-Arabic recipes and food customs. A culinary expert in the Jewish communities of the Middle East, Mediterranean, Central Asia, and North Africa, 
Jennifer teaches cooking at the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE) and at the Jewish Community Center Manhattan (JCC). She also offers private lessons and works for a variety of clients in the New York City area as a personal chef. In addition, Jennifer provides Jewish food and culture tours on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Her first cookbook-memoir, A Fistful of Lentils: Syrian-Jewish Recipes From Grandma Fritzie’s Kitchen is a collection of recipe and stores from her family. Her second cookbook, Too Good To Passover is her second cookbook.

What does your Seder Plate say about you and your politics?

Beet

The Passover story of the ancient Israelites fleeing slavery in Egypt for freedom in their homeland of Jerusalem has become a metaphor for human suffering in the modern day. As a result, the Seder has turned into a stage for political discussion about civil and human rights. In addition to the traditional bitter herbs, charoset, spring vegetable, shank bone, salt water, and egg found on the Seder plate, new symbolic foods are being added to express our individual views about gender issues, animal rights, racism, bigotry, and war. In the early 1980s, Jewish feminist and scholar Susannah Heschel stirred things up by adding an orange to her Seder plate to represent the “inclusion for lesbians, gays, and others who are marginalized by the Jewish community.”1  In 2014, Rabbi Marcus added a big tomato to her Seder plate to bring attention to underpaid/overworked workers in the agriculture/tomato-picking industry.2  To acknowledge powerful female leaders, many households now include a second cup of wine alongside the Prophet Elijah’s to remember the Prophetess Miriam who helped her brother Moses lead the Israelites out of the desert. And for vegetarians, a red beet (similar in color to blood) takes the place of the shank bone to represent the Paschal Sacrifice made the eve of the first Passover, while olives or an olive branch is used to symbolize the hope for peace in the Middle East. 

For your Seder this year, will you add something new to your Seder plate and make a statement about one of the many issues our society is struggling with today?
Please send me your ideas!

Footnotes:
1 Cohen, Tamara. “An Orange on the Seder Plate,” MyJewishLearning.com.
[Source URL (retrieved on 3/13/2017):
http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/an-orange-on-the-seder-plate].

2 Lipman, Steve. “The Tomato Finds Its Place on the Seder Plate,” JewishWeek.TimesofIsrael.com, 3/27/12 [Source URL (retrieved on 3/13/17): http://jewishweek.timesofisrael.com/the-tomato-finds-its-place-on-the-seder-plate].

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