Tag Archives: egg

Seder Plate Checklist: Are you set?

Seder_Plate2_BlogBelow is a list of all the necessary Seder foods, along with the variety of ingredients that individuals from all over the Middle East, Mediterranean, Central Asia, and parts of Africa have used on their Seder table:

Z’roah (sacrificial lamb): Roasted lamb shank or chicken wing or leg (any with or without the meat on the bone)

Beitzah (egg): Hardboiled, singed, or slow-cooked with onion skins & coffee grinds

Charoset (sweet fruit spread): Variety using any or a mixture of the following: dates, apricots, apples, oranges, pomegranate seeds, figs, raisins, bananas, sesame seeds, walnuts, almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pistachios, fresh and dried ginger, ground rose petals, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, allspice, anise, red wine, grape juice, vinegar, orange blossom water

Karpas (spring vegetable): Celery, celery leaves, cucumber

Maror (bitter herb): Romaine lettuce, red radish, bitter greens salad, lemon peel,
endive, frisée, chickory, arugula 

Representing sweat & tears: Salt water, white/red/cider vinegar, lemon or lime juice

MatzahCommercially-bought small square kind, larger Shmura Matzah type,
homemade and soft, or very  crispy and smooth: up to 3x size of a large pizza!

QUESTION: What do YOU use on your Seder plate or table?
SEND ME YOUR SEDER PLATE PHOTOS!

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The Sacrificial Egg and the Paschal Lamb: When Passover and Easter Cross Paths

Egg_Brown_Korban

The “Korban Chagigah,” or Festival Sacrifice
(Made with Coffee Grounds and Onion Skins)

According to the Torah, the Paschal (or Passover) lamb (also known as the Korban) was first sacrificed and then offered to God the night that the Israelites began their Exodus out of Egypt. The blood from this lamb was then used to paint a marker on the door posts of the home of each Israelite as a sign to God that he should pass over their home as he went to slay each firstborn Egyptian boy. It is for this reason we eat lamb on Passover, and according to this direct translation in the New Oxford Annotated Bible, even the instructions on how to prepare the lamb (“roasted,” NOT boiled please!)  is very clearly commanded by God:

Exodus 12: The Lord said to Moses
and Aaron in the land of Egypt,

“This month (Nisan) shall be for you the beginning of months; it shall be the first month of the year for you. Tell all the congregation of Israel that on the tenth day of this month they shall take every man a lamb according to their father’s houses, a lamb for a household… and you shall keep it until the fourteenth day of this month (Passover), when the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill their lambs in the evening. Then they shall take some of the blood, and put it on the two doorposts and the lintel of the houses in which they eat them. They shall eat the flesh that night, roasted; with unleavened bread and bitter herbs they shall eat it. Do not eat any of it raw or boiled with water, but roasted… It is the Lord’s Passover. For I will pass through the land of Egypt that night, and I will smite all the first-born in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and on all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgements: I am the Lord. The blood shall be a sign for you, upon the houses where you are; and when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and no plague shall fall upon you to destroy you, when I smite the land of Egypt.”

According to one source (History.com) many of those Jews who later converted to Christianity continued this Passover ritual of roasted lamb for Easter (the day of the resurrection of Jesus Christ), referring to it as the “Lamb of God”. Easter takes place around the same time as Passover does each year, and some scholars believe that the Last Supper, which supposedly took place the night before Jesus’s crucifixion, was in fact a Passover dinner.

Egg_Painted_BlogAs a symbol for life, rebirth, renewal, spring, and eternity since ancient times, the art of egg decoration predates Christianity. According to some sources (see History.com), Mesopotamian Christians began dying eggs red for Easter to recall the blood of Christ, a tradition which carried on to Eastern Europe and evolved into painting the eggs in decorative colors and patterns. Eggs also play an important role on the Seder plate for Passover. This roasted egg is known as the Korban Chagigah (“festival sacrifice;” see photo at top of post) to symbolize the mourning over the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem (by the Romans in
70 C.E./A.D.), and our inability to make a proper lamb/meat sacrifice to God since then. The egg (representing life) is dipped into salt water symbolizing our tears of mourning, as well as those of our ancestors.

For those of you celebrating Easter or Passover:
Do you serve lamb for the holiday? If so, how do you prepare it?
Do you have any special traditions that use eggs (such as hiding them or decorating them)?
What do you know about the meaning of eggs and lamb during this holiday?

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