Bukharian Rhubarb Salad with Beets, Mint, and Coriander Leaves

Salad_RhubarbBeet3_blog

Inspired by a simple rhubarb and scallion recipe in Amnun’s Bukharian cookbook, I decided to try working with rhubarb to create a salad that would be in the Bukharian/Afghani chapter of my Passover cookbook. I found the use of rhubarb as an ingredient in a savory salad intriguing, as my only association with rhubarb was in sweets, cooked with a lot of sugar and combined with strawberries for a preserve or pie. However, when I tasted the rhubarb raw, I found it to be too tart for the American palate. I decided to toss it with a few tablespoons of sugar, let it marinate, then roast it for a mere 5 minutes to not only tenderize the rhubarb, but cut some of the tart/bitterness and bring out its natural fruitiness, which it did. The result was a relish-salad that was both festive as well as summery, something that would go well with any meat barbecue or vegetarian picnic. Try it for this July Fourth and let me know what you think!

Salota az Ryevozgu Lablabu: Rhubarb and Beet Salad with Scallions, Mint, and Coriander Leaves
(Yield: Serves 6 / Makes 3 cups)

For Salad:
1 pound rhubarb stalks, ends removed and discarded, chopped into ¼-inch cubes (2 full cups)
3 tablespoons sugar
1 large boiled beet, cut into ¼-inch cubes (you will need only 1 cup total)
¼ cup finely chopped scallions
½ cup coarsely chopped coriander leaves
¼ cup finely chopped mint leaves

For Dressing:
2 tablespoons canola, sunflower, or vegetable oil
2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
½ teaspoon kosher salt
3 to 4 grindings of fresh black pepper

STEPS:
1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. While oven is heating up, toss rhubarb and sugar in a small baking pan and let sit for 10 minutes (about the time it takes to heat up your oven). Place pan on the top rack of the oven and roast rhubarb until just tender, but not mushy, only about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.

2. Combine cooled rhubarb with rest of salad ingredients in a medium mixing bowl. Add the dressing ingredients and toss again. Let salad sit (at room temperature) for 30 minutes to 1 hour to marinate then serve, or store in refrigerator until ready to serve.

©Jennifer Felicia Abadi:  www.TooGoodToPassover.com / jabadi@FistfulofLentils.com

In “Jewish Week,” this week!

Please check out yesterday’s article about me and
Sephardic cooking by Caroline Lagnado!

JEWISH WEEK: The Memory is in their Taste Buds

http://www.thejewishweek.com/special-sections/sephardim-new-york/memory-their-taste-buds

Shrab (Libyan Golden Raisin “Wine” with Cinnamon Sticks)

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From Libya to Georgia, several individuals described to me the process of making their own special wine or unfermented grape juice for the Passover holiday. Some said that as children they couldn’t wait to stomp on the fresh grapes that were used to make actual wine, while others remembered helping their mothers or grandmothers combine dried grapes (raisins) with sugar and water to create a syrupy treat. Either way, it was a great activity for kids who looked forward to it year after year, and a new tradition that I started with my two girls this Passover.

Yield: Serves 12 / Makes 12 eight-ounce cups

1 1/2 pounds golden raisins (black raisins may be substituted)
20 cups cold water
3 cups sugar
3 to 4 cinnamon sticks, about 4 inches long each

1. Soak the raisins with the cold water in a large pot for 12 hours or overnight, covered.

2. Bring pot of soaked raisins  with the sugar and cinnamon sticks to a boil over high heat.

3. Reduce to a medium heat and slow boil until the liquid reduces by about a third,
approximately 2 1/2 hours.

4. Remove from heat and cool completely before pouring into two large pitchers.
Chill in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours or preferably 12 hours or overnight.
Drink will keep in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

©Jennifer Felicia Abadi:  www.TooGoodToPassover.com / jabadi@FistfulofLentils.com

Sephardic Culture: Walking and Tasting Tour in Bercelona!

Are you interested in learning about Sephardic food and history, right where it happened?
Check out my friend Janet Amateau’s cultural walking tour, and get a taste of Judeo-Spanish history,
one bite at a time!

JanetAmateau_Barcelona_blog

Photo: Courtesy of Janet Amateau

The Second Night: A Tunisian Seder

For the second night of Passover we went to a Tunisian Seder at Jennifer and Philippe’s on the Upper West Side. The photo below is of their beautiful Tunisian Seder plate, which includes a Tunisian style charoset (upper left portion of plate) that I made myself of apples, dates, almonds, toasted sesame seeds, and rosewater. The final paste I formed into small balls, then rolled in finely ground rose petals:

SederPlate_Tunisian_6_blog

 

The photo below shows Jennifer carrying the Seder plate around the table while circling each person’s head — a common Sephardic and Middle Eastern Seder custom. This ritual signifies good luck for the year to come, but more importantly connects each guest present to the story of the Exodus from Egypt:

Philippe_Jenny_SederPlate_4_blog

How did you break your bread fast? The Tunisian Sandwich.

For the last night of Passover to break the bread fast, many Tunisians will go to a Tunisian store to take out a special sandwich called Casse-Croûte. This sandwich is made on an Italian style bread loaf or large roll (very crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside) spread with harissa or Tunisian hot sauce, pickled red bell peppers or cooked red pepper and tomato salad (mechouia/makbouba), and olive oil, then filled with sliced olives, canned tuna, capers, and sliced hardboiled eggs, salt, and pepper. Yes, it is greasy, but VERY delicious, and many will describe that sensational moment of their first bite after a long week of abstinence from bread. 

How did you break your bread fast? What did you eat?
(And what did you find yourself missing most this past holiday week?)

Sandwich_Tunisian_CasseCroute_4_Blog

Casse Croûte Tunisien: Tunisian Hero with Tuna, Eggs,
Pickled Peppers & Hot Pepper Sauce
(Yield: Makes one 8- or 10-inch sandwich good for 1 to 2 people)

For main part of sandwich:
One 8- or 10-inch Italian roll, hero, or small French baguette (can be a wedge of a larger bread)
2 to 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup coarsely chopped pickled red peppers (from jar)
2 tablespoons finely chopped yellow onions
2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander leaves
1 medium tomato, thinly sliced
2 hardboiled eggs, thinly sliced
1 can light (not white) tuna in oil, drained and slightly mashed with a fork

For Garnish:
2 tablespoons capers
2 tablespoons pitted and sliced or coarsely chopped green and or black olives
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
Piece of fresh lemon (to squeeze on top)
Salt and pepper to taste
Few teaspoons harissa (Tunisian hot sauce), optional (recipe following, store-bought fine to use)

1. Slice roll horizontally leaving it intact (do not cut all the way through!)

2. Open up roll and brush both sides generously with olive oil.

3. Sprinkle both sides with the chopped red peppers, onions, and coriander leaves.

4. Layer both sides with the tomato slices, followed by the egg, and the tuna running down the middle.

5. Garnish with the capers and olives, and drizzle with extra olive oil, lemon juice, salt and black pepper, and lastly harissa or special Tunisian hot sauce, if desired. Cut sandwich in half or in thirds and serve immediately.

©Jennifer Felicia Abadi:  www.TooGoodToPassover.com / jabadi@FistfulofLentils.com

 

Harissa: Tunisian Hot Pepper Sauce with Caraway, Coriander & Cilantro
(Yield: Serves 10 / Makes About ¾ to 1 Cup)

For Harissa
1 medium red bell pepper (about 5 ounces), rinsed and patted dry

1 medium green jalapeno pepper (about 1 ounce), rinsed and patted dry
1 medium red jalapeno pepper (about 1 ounce), rinsed and patted dry
3 extra large or 4 to 5 medium cloves garlic
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for rubbing the outsides of the peppers and garlic cloves
¾ teaspoon caraway seeds
½ teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon unrefined pure cane sugar
¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
2 tablespoons fresh coriander (cilantro) leaves, or flat leaf parsley leaves 
    (Note: do not chop leaves with stems: use only the leaves by separating them from stems)

For Serving:
Extra virgin olive oil, lightly sprinkled on top
1 tablespoon finely chopped coriander (cilantro) leaves and/or parsley leaves

1. Preheat the broiler (set on “Hi” if using an electric oven).

2. Rub a small amount of olive oil all around the outside of each pepper and garlic clove, then place them onto a baking sheet or pan and set under the broiler. Once garlic cloves begin to turn a brownish-black color (after 8 to 10 minutes), remove from pan and place onto a plate to cool. When skins of peppers begin to blacken and blister (an additional 5 minutes), turn each one over to broil the opposite side (another 10 to 15 minutes). Keep turning and rotating the peppers until all sides blister. Remove from the broiler and let cool until lukewarm. Meanwhile, prepare the spices.

3. Place the caraway seeds and coriander seeds into a small frying pan or skillet and toast, over medium heat, until they start to pop and crackle, about 2 to 3 minutes. (Shake pan every minute or so to prevent burning). Remove from heat and cool completely (about 10 minutes). Place into a spice grinder or mortar and pestle and grind until fine. Set aside and return to the peppers.

4. (Note: For handling the hot peppers you may want to wear rubber gloves to prevent your hands and fingers from burning; Be careful of wiping your eyes and make sure to wash your hands thoroughly when done!) Pull out the stems from each pepper and discard. Gently peel away the thin skin from the bell pepper and discard (no need to do this for the hot peppers). Cut each pepper in half, and using a spoon or a paper towel, gently scrape out and discard all of the seeds from the inside of each pepper.

5. Very coarsely cut the peppers (1-inch pieces is fine) and place into a food processor, along with the whole garlic cloves.

6. Add the 2 tablespoons of olive oil and pulse until the peppers are very finely pureed.

7. Add the ground caraway-coriander mixture, sugar, and salt, and pulse until very smooth. Add the fresh coriander or parsley leaves and pulse one more time to blend.

8. Serve sprinkled with olive oil, and finely chopped coriander leaves and/or parsley leaves, alongside grilled meat, chicken or fish, or as a garnish with soups and stews, or sprinkled over your favorite salad or sandwich. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator (sprinkled with olive oil to prevent spoilage), for up to 1 week. 

©Jennifer Felicia Abadi:  www.TooGoodToPassover.com / jabadi@FistfulofLentils.com

 

Send me a photo of your Seder plate!

The Seder plate has become one of the most beautiful and creative portions of the Seder meal.
Won’t you please share it with me and the community, and send me your photos?
I would love to post them on the blog after Passover is over. 

And if you can’t send a photo, please just post a comment and let me know
what you used for your Seder foods!

Have a great Passover everyone. Chag Sameach!

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